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A new 3D-printed structural concrete footbridge is set to be developed in Plaine Commune Grand Paris. The footbridge is part of the development in anticipation of the 2024 Olympic Games to be held in Paris, France.

3D-Printed Footbridge in Paris
Image Courtesy: Lavigne & Cheron Architects

This landmark step in 3D structural concrete printing marks the construction sector’s entry into the era of industrialization 4.0.

The project has been awarded to a consortium of Freyssinet/ Lavigne & Cheron Architects/ Quadric/ XtreeE/ LafargeHolcim, which will design and build the 40-meter pedestrian footbridge whose deck will be entirely made of 3D-printed structural concrete.

The 3D printing technology developed by XtreeE focuses on designing concrete structures that are more durable, sophisticated, and promote sustainable development.

The technology is gaining popularity due to a greater emphasis on freedom of design, along with a significant reduction in the materials used; and lower cost, with a target for a 60% reduction in concrete consumption than conventional structures.

3D-Printed Footbridge in Paris
Image Courtesy: Lavigne & Cheron Architects

Apart from the digital design of the structure, the footbridge components will be manufactured in industrial conditions and will be assembled on site to bring in agility and frugality into the project. This will ensure less transport, elimination for formwork, and greater freedom of form for architects.

This project takes the evolution of additive manufacturing to a higher level. The number of such projects has kept growing in the last couple of years—it all began with the first 3D printed bridge, which opened in Amsterdam in 2017. The technology is about to flourish in the coming years, with Dubai already planning to 3D print 25% of the city’s structures by 2030.

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