Sign Up

Sign Up to The Constructor to ask questions, answer questions, write articles, and connect with other people. VIP members get additional benefits.

Sign In

Login to The Constructor to ask questions, answer people’s questions, write articles & connect with other people. VIP members get additional benefits.

Free Signup or Login to continue Reading...

Forgot Password

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link and will create a new password via email.

Sorry, you do not have permission to ask a question, You must login to ask question. Become VIP Member

Free Signup or Login to continue Reading...

Do you need to remove the ads? Become VIP Member

Print, PDF & Email

Seismic zones in Indian subcontinent is divided into four seismic zones (II, III, IV, and V) based on scientific inputs relating to seismicity, earthquakes occurred in the past and tectonic setup of the region.

Previously, earthquake zones divided into five zones with respect to the severity of the earthquakes, but Bureau of Indian Standards [IS 1893 (Part I):2002], has grouped the country into four seismic zones.; the first and second seismic zones were unified.

The bureau of Indian standards is the official agency for publishing the seismic hazard maps and codes. It has brought out versions of seismic zoning map: a six zone map in 1962, a seven zone map in 1966, and a five zone map 1970/1984.

Seismic Active Zone

Seismic Zone II

Area with minor damage ( i.e., causing damages to structures with fundamentally periods greater than 1.0 second ) earthquakes corresponding to intensities V to VI of MM scale ( MM – Modified Mercalli Intensity scale). It covers the areas which are not covered by other three seismic zones discussed below.

Seismic Zone III

Moderate damage corresponding to intensity VII of MM scale. It comprises Kerala, Goa, Lakshadweep islands, remaining parts of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat and West Bengal, Parts of Punjab, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Maharashtra, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu and Karnataka.

Seismic Zone IV

Major damage corresponding to intensity VII and higher of MM scale. It covers remaining parts of Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh, National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, Sikkim, Northern Parts of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and West Bengal, parts of Gujarat and small portions of Maharashtra near the west coast and Rajasthan.

Seismic Zone V

Area determines by pro seismically of certain major fault systems. It is seismically the most active region, and comprises entire northeastern India, parts of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Rann of Kutch in Gujarat, part of North Bihar and Andaman & Nicobar Islands.

Earthquake zone V is the most vulnerable to earthquakes, where historically some of the country’s most powerful shock have occurred. Earthquakes with magnitudes in excess of 7.0 have occured in these areas, and have had intensities higher than IX.

Seismic Zones in Indian Subcontinent and Intensity of the Map
Fig. 1: Seismic Zones in Indian Subcontinent and Intensity of the Map

Richter Scale

Seismic waves are the vibrations from earthquakes that travel through the Earth; they are recorded on instruments called seismographs. Seismographs record a zigzag trace that shows the varying amplitude of ground oscillations beneath the instrument.

Sensitive seismographs, which greatly magnify these ground motions, can detect strong earthquakes from sources anywhere in the world. The time, locations, and magnitude of an earthquake can be determined from the data recorded by seismograph stations.

The magnitude of an earthquake is determined from the logarithm of the amplitude of waves recorded by seismographs. Adjustments are included for the variation in the distance between the various seismographs and the epicenter of the earthquakes. On the Richter Scale, magnitude is expressed in whole numbers and decimal fractions.

For example, a magnitude 5.3 might be computed for a moderate earthquake, and a strong earthquake might be rated as magnitude 6.3. Because of the logarithmic basis of the scale, each whole number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase in measured amplitude; as an estimate of energy, each whole number step in the magnitude scale corresponds to the release of about 31 times more energy than the amount associated with the preceding whole number value

Earthquakes with magnitude of about 2.0 or less are usually call micro earthquakes; they are not commonly felt by people and are generally recorded only on local seismographs.

Events with magnitudes of about 4.5 or greater – there are several thousand such shocks annually – are strong enough to be recorded by sensitive seismographs all over the world. Great earthquakes, such as the 1964 Good Friday earthquake in Alaska, have magnitudes of 8.0 or higher.

Although the Richter Scale has no upper limit, the largest known shocks have had magnitudes in the 8.8 to 8.9 range. Recently, another scale called the moment magnitude scale has been devised for more precise study of great earthquakes. The Richter Scale is not used to express damage.

An earthquake in a densely populated area which results in many deaths and considerable damage may have the same magnitude as a shock in a remote area that does nothing more than frighten the wildlife. Large-magnitude earthquakes that occur beneath the oceans may not even be felt by humans.

Madeh Izat Hamakareem

Related Posts

3 Comments

Leave a comment

You must login to add a new comment.

Free Signup or Login to continue Reading...